The results from the Toronto Independent Film Awards came in and we received a Best Short Documentary Nomination for MacLeod. This is really wonderful news. It’s really an honor to get recognition from this festival. Most folks don’t really care that you had no budget for your film. There is just so much “content” now that people seem to be overfed in regard to video, film and television. For a lot of filmmakers who put literally years into some of their films it can be a tough pill to swallow when no one even wants to play your flick.

If you think about it, even some of larger studio films people don’t enjoy and they had hundreds of millions of dollars and years to get the film right. The audience seems to be so much pickier these days and you have to wonder if immersive video games will just take over. People are so picky that they need a custom experience to like something. I think story telling will always be around, but you have to wonder how A.I. will change things. Kevin MacLeod the subject of my documentary believes A.I. will be able to score whole films relatively soon and that the A.I. will be exceptional at it. I think about this sometimes. If A.I. can create music that’s makes us feel sad, can it make us music that will make us suicidal? At some point maybe it could and do we really know our limits in this way, how we can be emotional manipulated? Can A.I. make music that makes us fall asleep, fall in love and what happens when A.I. has unlimited intelligence at a nearly unlimited rate of growth.

During these strange times, it does make you wonder about the future. I spent so much time trying to make my mark in the industry and to some degree I’d say I did in the last few years, people for the most part know my VHS Massacre films and that’s a good feeling. VHS Massacre Too is screening at the Chicago Horror Film Festival this month! This is another amazing goal met to screen at one of the most important horror film festivals in the nation. VHS Massacre Too also screened multiple times on Shudder’s Mid May Massacre. I was on a panel with Joe Bob Briggs, Debbie Rochon, James Richardson and Tim Kulig. So far it was a highlight to my film career. It would be nice if I can top that but it’s a tall order.

These last few years have pulled the veil back on the entertainment industry, you realize that the people who are celebrities are isolated people who have a hard time trusting or truly knowing anyone. They lose their anonymity and most seem miserable spending large sums of money simply to be by themselves. I’m glad I never got famous but I’m glad that some people know my work. That’s probably the best scenario. There is this David Bowie music video with Tilda Swinton The Stars are out Tonight, in the video the famous musicians and celebrities fantasize about being average citizens and even spy on regular folks, acknowledging the lives they could have led as regular citizens. This probably happens, lots of famous folks probably debate the trade-off in privacy and the need to keep working to maintain a lifestyle that keeps them from dealing with the mobs. The money I’m sure they enjoy but frankly if they don’t constantly keep working they seem to be bled dry by agencies, managers and staff. It honestly seems like a casino ride, it may be better to get out on top or risk losing it all.

It makes you think about things. I hope I can keep making feature films that I care about but in the end my family is more important than anything in this world. The pandemic really put that into focus. I think it’s good to aspire to do great things and make meaningful art. Career is important too but as life kicks your ass more and more, even if you get that great job or promotion it’s just never really enough, where as family can be. It can make you feel like you have a life and a real purpose above all else. I don’t know what’s in store for me but I have some optimism. I’m starting preproduction on a new documentary and that seems to be gaining some momentum. More news to come!

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